Trips & Trails: Green Country Oklahoma Adventure Tour G.O.A.T.

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The Green Country Oklahoma Adventure Tour or GOAT meanders through the foothills of the Ozarks with many areas to jump off into town for a resupply or to embrace some of the unique southern food available in the area. Wild spaces and chances to view wildlife are plentiful as the route passes through the JT Nickel Preserve, Spavinaw Hills Wildlife Management Area, and the Cherokee State Game Refuge. Points of interest include the home and museum of famous Cherokee Indian Sequoyah, a motorcycle museum, historical schoolhouses, plus numerous swimming holes and off-road exploration opportunities.

The route passes through many towns along the way with reliable resupply and refuel points in Tahlequah and Sallisaw on the south end and Langley, Grove, and West Siloam Springs on the north end. The Ozarks are the relocated home to over twenty Native American tribes and most historical sites along the GOAT belong to the Cherokee and Muskogee (Creek) Nation. History spills out of the backroads and sleepy towns as the route winds through oak hollows and over rolling hills.

The GOAT is a fantastic opportunity for new or young riders or drivers to get comfortable in the backcountry while not being overwhelmed by extreme remoteness and difficult terrain. This route was designed with a modern adventure motorcycle in mind, but can be completed in just about any vehicle with a confident driver.


Photo credit: Jaron Robison

Photo credit: Jaron Robison


WHAT TO KNOW:

Time: 2 – 5 days

Distance: 458 miles

Fuel: Fuel is readily available in nearly every town on the route and even the thirstiest vehicle should have plenty of opportunities to refuel.

Water: Plan to bring more water than you anticipate requiring. Plan on more than one gallon of water per person per day.

Permits: No permits are required.

Other considerations:

◦ Extreme heat and humidity make traveling this route uncomfortable and potentially more dangerous June – August as temperatures can climb to over 100°F with humidity levels between 60 and 70 percent. 

◦ Cell service is non-existent along much of this route and medical services could be several hours away at best in some locations. 


Header image credit: Zach Elseman @okienomads

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Photo by Brett Willhelm

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